DSCC News

What riches lie in the deep sea?

20 August 2014

Source: Global

Author: Steph Draper

As fishing and the harvesting of metals, gas and oil have expanded deeper and deeper into the ocean, scientists are drawing attention to the services provided by the deep sea, the world's largest environment.

"This is the time to discuss deep-sea stewardship before exploitation is too much farther underway," says lead-author Andrew Thurber. In a review published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU), Thurber and colleagues summarise what this habitat provides to humans, and emphasise the need to protect it.

 "The deep sea realm is so distant, but affects us in so many ways. That's where the passion lies: to tell everyone what's down there and that we still have a lot to explore," says co-author Jeroen Ingels of Plymouth Marine Laboratory in the UK.

"What we know highlights that it provides much directly to society," says Thurber, a researcher at the College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University in the US. Yet, the deep sea is facing impacts from climate change and, as resources are depleted elsewhere, is being increasingly exploited by humans for food, energy and metals like gold and silver.

"We felt we had to do something," says Ingels. "We all felt passionate about placing the deep sea in a relevant context and found that there was little out there aimed at explaining what the deep sea does for us to a broad audience that includes scientists, the non-specialists and ultimately the policy makers. There was a gap to be filled. So we said: 'Let's just make this happen'."

For more, go to: globalhse.net/index.php/environment/item/173-what-riches-lie-in-the-deep-sea